Divorce & separation



Do it yourself

Self-help guides

Divorce

If a couple agrees about all related family issues, you can get a divorce without appearing in court.

Do your own undefended (uncontested) divorce (Supreme Court)
All the documents you need to apply for a desk-order divorce in BC, when you and your spouse agree. Instructions for applying on your own or together with your spouse.

Get a copy of your marriage certificate
Explains how to get a copy of your marriage certificate (needed for a divorce) if you were married in BC, in another province, or in another country.


Affidavits

Draft an affidavit (Supreme Court)


Agreements

If a couple agrees about family issues, you can put that into a written legal agreement.

File your agreement in Provincial Court
Explains how to create a court file for your case in Provincial Court by taking your signed agreement to the court registry.

File your agreement in Supreme Court
Explains how to create a court file for your case in Supreme Court by taking your signed agreement to the court registry.

Set aside all or part of an agreement (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains how to ask the court to change an agreement by asking the court to replace all or part of it with a new court order.

Write your own separation agreement
Explains how to write a legally binding separation agreement if you're going through a separation and/or divorce.


Family Maintenance Enforcement Program

Staff in the BC Family Maintenance Enforcement Program (FMEP) can monitor child and/or spousal support payments in court orders and agreements. They can take action to get money from payors who fall behind.

Deal with a committal hearing (for payors)
This guide tells you how to prepare for a committal hearing, options to avoid the hearing, what you have to explain to the judge, how to apply to change an order, and how the judge might rule at the hearing.


Family orders if you can agree

Whether or not you're applying for a divorce, you can get a consent order about your family issues (parenting, child/spousal support, and/or division of property/debts).

Get a final family order

Get a final family order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains how to apply for a final family consent order about parenting, support, or property.

Get an interim family order

Start a family law case to get a new order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains the steps you need to take before you can apply for an interim family consent order about parenting or support.

Get an interim family order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains how to get a temporary order to put parenting or support arrangements in place until a judge can make a final family order.

Change a family order

Change a family order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains how to apply to change an existing court order.


Family orders if you can't agree

Whether or not you're applying for a divorce, you can get a consent order about your family issues (parenting, child/spousal support, and/or division of property/debts).

Get a final family order

Start a family law case to get a new order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains the steps you need to take before you can apply for a final family order about parenting or support.

Get a final family order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains how to apply for a court ruling that will decide your parenting or support issues.

Get an interim family order

Start a family law case to get a new order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains the steps you need to take before you can apply for an interim family order about parenting or support.

Get an interim family order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains how to get a temporary court ruling to put parenting or support arrangements in place until a judge can make a final order.

Change a family order

Start a family law case to change an order (Provincial Court)
Explains the steps you need to take before you can apply to change an existing Provincial Court family order.

Change a family order (Provincial or Supreme Court)
Explains how to apply to change an existing order.^ Back to top

Court forms

Court forms (includes links to sample completed forms)