Supreme Court — If you can't agree

How to change a family order

Who these guides are for and how they work

Who these guides are for

These do-it-yourself guides are for people who:

  • can't agree with the other party about how to change a parenting or support order, and
  • want to change an order that was originally made in the Supreme Court of British Columbia, or
  • want to respond to an application to change (make a variation to) an order that was made in the Supreme Court of British Columbia.

However, if either party lives outside of BC, you may not be able to use these guides. Please contact a lawyer for advice.

Important: If you have a family law case in Supreme Court, read this information about applying for mediation before continuing with these guides.

How these guides work

These guides include:

  • information about and step-by-step instructions on changing a Supreme Court family order,
  • instructions about which forms to use and what to do with them,
  • blank forms with instructions for filling them out, and
  • information about what happens when you go to court, and how to represent yourself if you don't have a lawyer.

The process of applying to change an order is quite complex. Read through all of these instructions before you begin so that you understand the information you need to collect, the documents and forms you need to prepare, the time periods you have to work with, and what you can expect in court. Once you're familiar with the instructions, fill out the forms you need.

Which guide should I use?

If you're applying to change a final family order (e.g., for parenting or support), you're the applicant. Choose the guide on the left.

If you're responding to an application to change a final family order (e.g., for parenting or support), you're the respondent. Choose the guide on the right.